Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
There are several ways to keep your equipment clean. The most common strategies given by maid service Cape Cod are listed below.
Boiling
Boiling the equipment in water is the most fundamental way to sanitize equipment. No chemicals are needed, and a container big enough to hold the equipment, water, and a heat source is all the winemaker needs. This may seem like a simple and cheaper choice if you are just starting out in winemaking, but we do not suggest using this technique.
Benefits: no chemicals required, easily available, water is cheap-Benefits: time consuming, large containers for boiling, risk of burning, drawbacks
Chlorine
Chlorine is readily available and is a good cleaner and disinfectant in the form of household bleach. It serves as a decent sanitizer for glass equipment, but should not be used on plastic equipment. Since the plastic will absorb chlorine, undesired flavors will be created in your wine.
Benefits: readily available in the form of household bleach, inexpensive-Disadvantages: can be used on plastic, textile ruins, stainless steel corrodes,
Iodophorus
The food service industry and the medical industry use Iodophor to sanitize equipment. It is a detergent with iodine, germicide and sanitizer. It is a no-rinse sanitizer and very simple to use overall, on the basis of practicality of use. You can, for instance, use 1⁄4 ounce per 2 1⁄2 gallons of water for a 12.5 ppm solution when using an Io-Star Iodophor Sanitizer. You should apply your equipment to the solution at this stage of concentration and it takes approximately 10 minutes to sanitize. Then allow the appliance to drip dry for another 10 minutes prior to use.
Benefits: economical, no-rinse sanitizer-Benefits: harmful in high concentrations, fabric stains, skin
Phosphate Based Sanitizers
When someone calls Quality Wine and asks for guidance on a sanitizing solution, an acid-based product-Star San Acid Sanitizer for Surface Sanitation-is the first approach we turn to. This is a no-rinse sanitizer solution that is very easy to use and maintain. It is made of phosphoric acid, which is food-grade and healthy for humans and the environment.
Benefits: no-rinse sanitizer, fast sanitizing time-Benefits: harmful in high concentrations, wearing protective clothing
The Powder of Potassium Metabisulfite
By inhibiting bacteria and wild yeast, potassium metabisulfite sanitizes the machinery. It releases sulfur dioxide when mixed with water, which is a potent antiseptic. You will note a strong sulfur odor after applying the powder to water, and people allergic to sulphites may be affected by its potency. As no additional rinsing with clean water is needed, this method is considered a cost-effective sanitizing rinse.
Benefits: long shelf life, economical, no rinsing required-Benefits: precise calculation skills required, some people are allergic to sulfites.
Whatever sanitizing agent you decide to use during your winemaking process, during the sanitation cycle, it is important to never get lazy.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Laurel Gray Vineyards

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