Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
Two tumblers of whisky

Buy what you enjoy and use trusted sellers...

The post Whisky for investment: Eight of the best appeared first on Decanter.


Two tumblers of whisky

Buy what you enjoy and use trusted sellers...

The post Whisky for investment: Eight of the best appeared first on Decanter.

Two tumblers of whisky

The concept of investing in whisky is relatively new, although the trade in old and rare bottles has been around for decades. What began as a niche for enthusiasts has evolved into a world of investment funds, consultants and indices charting the evolution of auction prices.

There are many motivations behind buying whisky for investment purposes, from ‘flippers’ looking to sell on for a short-term profit, to whisky lovers out to fund their next purchases, to those with the patience and capital to target a longer-term profit.

It’s a good idea to buy what you like (you might have to drink it one day), to use trusted sellers who will steer you away from fake whiskies and to exercise caution and patience, waiting for the right whisky and the right price. Oh, and try to have fun…

Here are eight options that illustrate the breadth of collectable and investable whisky today.

Best whisky for investment: Eight top bottles


Black Bowmore DB5 1964

In 1993, Black Bowmore cost less than £100 a bottle. A medium-peated Islay single malt, matured in a Williams & Humbert Walnut Brown oloroso Sherry butt, its remarkable power, complexity and subtlety made it a legend – and this might be its apogee: matured for 31 years, limited to 25 bottles with über-luxurious packaging in association with Aston Martin. At £50,000, it shows how far high-end Scotch has come. Alc 49.6%


Hakushu 18 Year Old

Japanese whisky’s remarkable ascent from anonymity to global phenomenon has created a severe shortage of aged liquid and rocketing prices – making even an 18-year-old single malt worth more than £500. This remarkable combination of peated and unpeated spirits and different distillation regimes is a precise and richly fruited delight that shows just why. Alc 43%


Johnnie Walker Blue Label Ghost and Rare Port Ellen

Single malts hog the headlines, but some of the finest whiskies on the planet are blends. This superb creation showcases fabled Islay ‘ghost’ distillery Port Ellen’s peated savour alongside rare grain whiskies from closed Carsebridge and Caledonian, plus aged malt from Mortlach, Dailuaine, Cragganmore, Blair Athol and Oban. At a few hundred quid, it’s a snip. Alc 43.8%


Laphroaig 30 Year Old The Ian Hunter Story Book 2

For those familiar with its famously medicinal 10-year-old iteration, aged Laphroaig is a revelation. The peat softens and retreats, ushering in a remarkable spiced fruit character, alongside dark honey and liquorice. This is the second in a series commemorating the Islay distillery’s legendary manager of a century ago. Alc 48.2%


Macallan 36 Year Old Director’s Special

Macallan is the most famous and collectable whisky in the world – the DRC or Lafite of Scotch; so famous that it’s worth seeking out unusual expressions such as this – an independent bottling by Elixir Distillers that eschews the distillery’s typical Sherried influence for something more classically Speyside: tropical fruit, toast and honey, baking spices and lemon icing. A giant’s gentler side. Alc 42.1%


Mortlach 21 Years Old (Special Releases 2020)

Diageo’s annual series of Special Releases are eagerly awaited, limited editions from the company’s unrivalled roster of distilleries. Here, the combination of famously feral Mortlach spirit with relatively restrained PX and oloroso Sherry casks creates a lightly meaty, juicily fruity powerhouse with not a little polish. A beast in a velvet smoking jacket. Alc 56.9%


Redbreast Dream Cask Ruby Port Edition

Long revered by insiders as the epitome of Ireland’s unique pot still style, Redbreast is now getting the global recognition it richly deserves. Nearly 7,500 people signed up online for a chance to buy one of only 900 bottles of this third Dream Cask bottling: a richly fruited, tangy whiskey of real depth and power thanks to 28 years and more of ageing. Alc 51.5%


Rosebank 30 Year Old ‘Release One’

To mark the planned resurrection of Lowland distillery Rosebank, new owner Ian Macleod Distillers has initiated a series of annual releases with this 1990 vintage single malt. Refill Sherry and Bourbon casks and long ageing have created an ethereal masterpiece of soft fruit, perfumed honey, Parma Violets and light spices. A paean to a (temporarily) lost legend. Alc 48.6%


Disclaimer: This article has been published for informational purposes only and does not constitute investment advice. Information is subject to change, and the prices and availability of whiskies cited will vary between countries, currencies and retailers. Seek independent advice where necessary. Please be aware that prices can go down as well as up and that whisky investment is unregulated in several markets, including the UK.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Laurel Gray Vineyards

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