Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
Chef Mark Donald The Glenturret Whisky
Chef Mark Donald The Glenturret Whisky

The first fine-dining restaurant at a Scotch whisky distillery

The post Glenturret whisky distillery hires Michelin-starred chef appeared first on Decanter.


Chef Mark Donald The Glenturret Whisky
Chef Mark Donald The Glenturret Whisky

The first fine-dining restaurant at a Scotch whisky distillery

The post Glenturret whisky distillery hires Michelin-starred chef appeared first on Decanter.

Chef Mark Donald The Glenturret Whisky
Chef Mark Donald The Glenturret Whisky

Mark Donald, the Michelin-starred head chef at Edinburgh’s Number 1 at The Balmoral, is joining The Glenturret distillery in Perthshire to open the first fine-dining restaurant at a Scotch whisky distillery.

The Glenturret was bought in 2019 by Swiss entrepreneur Hansjörg Wyss and Silvio Denz, head of luxury goods firm Lalique Group. Lalique’s existing culinary investments include Villa René Lalique, the two-star Michelin restaurant and hotel in Alsace, and the one-star Michelin restaurant and hotel at Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey in Bordeaux.

Donald cut his culinary teeth at Stravaigin, a popular eatery in his home city of Glasgow, before undertaking a ‘formative’ season at Noma in Copenhagen. He spent two years at the two-star Michelin Restaurant Andrew Fairlie at The Gleneagles Hotel in Perthshire before moving to London to work at the two-star Hibiscus.

After four years as head chef at the Bentley restaurant in Sydney, Donald returned to Scotland in 2018 to take over the kitchen at Number 1 at The Balmoral, where he retained its Michelin star.

Donald said: ‘The distillery has a long history and great heritage – as does Lalique – so it was an exciting task to combine this with fresh, innovative ideas.

‘Working closely with the local producers and suppliers has been wonderful so far; together with my team, I feel we have managed to create a contemporary, thought-provoking menu wrapped in the genuine Scottish hospitality for which The Glenturret is renowned.’

The Glenturret, Scotland’s oldest working distillery, was previously home to The Famous Grouse Experience, a visitor centre run by Edrington, the owner of single malts including Highland Park and The Macallan.

While Scotland’s distillery visitors’ centres attracted a record 2.16 million visitors in 2019, the industry’s restaurants are often seen as lagging behind those in major wine tourism areas, such as Bordeaux or Napa Valley.

The Glenturret Lalique Restaurant is due to launch early this summer, after its visitors’ centre reopens on 26 April.


Staycation ideas: UK winery, distillery and brewery trips

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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Laurel Gray Vineyards

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