Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
Champagne Cocktails
Champagne Cocktails

Celebrate in style with this selection of classic Champagne cocktails that are easy to make at home...

The post Champagne cocktails to make at home appeared first on Decanter.


Champagne Cocktails
Champagne Cocktails

Celebrate in style with this selection of classic Champagne cocktails that are easy to make at home...

The post Champagne cocktails to make at home appeared first on Decanter.

Champagne Cocktails
Champagne Cocktails

With most of us partying at home this year, it’s a perfect opportunity to try your hand at cocktail creation. If Champagne is the celebration drink par excellence, then Champagne cocktails will dial those celebrations up to 11.

The good news is that many classic Champagne cocktails are super-easy to make, and involve little more than pouring your ingredients into a glass. But there are a few useful tips that will help you make cocktails like a pro.

First of all, chill your glassware. Pop your Champagne flutes or coupes into the freezer for a couple of hours and you’ll get an ice-cold, frosted glass that not only looks the part but helps to keep your drink at a perfect temperature.

Second, don’t use vintage Champagne or exclusive cuvées in sparkling cocktails. The complexity of these prestige Champagnes will be lost in the mix, so choose a non-vintage (NV) brut style – or even an ultra-brut for sweeter cocktails (see below).


Classic Champagne Cocktail

One of the oldest cocktails, tracing its roots back to the mid-1800s, this simple mix is a decadent treat – plus it’s easy to make. Simply build the ingredients in the glass and stir gently to mix. No cocktail shaker required.

Glass: Champagne flute

Garnish: None

Ingredients: 1 sugar cube, 2 or 3 dashes Angostura Bitters, 20ml Cognac , Champagne to top

Method: Drop the sugar cube into a chilled Champagne flute and saturate it with the bitters. Add the Cognac. Top up the glass with Champagne, stir gently to mix and serve.


French 75

Created in 1915 at the New York Bar in Paris by Harry MacElhone, this gin and fizz combo delivered such a kick that it felt like being shelled by a powerful French 75mm field gun used in World War I. A few of these will certainly get your party started…

Glass: Champagne flute or coupe

Garnish: Lemon twist

Ingredients: 60ml gin, 30ml freshly squeezed lemon juice, 1 tsp sugar syrup, Champagne to top

Method: Put the gin, lemon juice and sugar syrup into a cocktail shaker. Fill half way with ice and shake until your hands are cold. Strain into a chilled glass (flute or coupe) and top with Champagne. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Kir Royale

Starting life as a simple Kir or Kir Aperitif, this mix was created at the Café George in Dijon, where it was known as a Cassis Blanc and was made with Bourgogne Aligoté. But it was popularised by World War II French Resistance hero Canon Félix Kir, who gave his name to the drink. Your Kir becomes Royale when you add Champagne instead of white wine – choose an ultra brut or zero dosage stylee to balance the sweet fruitiness of the crème de cassis.

Glass: Champagne flute or coupe

Garnish: None

Ingredients: 10ml crème de cassis, Champagne to top

Method: Pour the crème de cassis into a chilled Champagne flute and fill the glass slowly with Champagne.


Twinkle

This modern classic was created in 2002 by Tony Conigliaro at The Lonsdale bar in London – and it has to be best name ever for a sparkly party drink. The original recipe used elderflower cordial, but St-Germain Elderflower Liqueur works brilliantly and is more commonly used today.

Glass: Champagne coupe

Garnish: Lemon twist

Ingredients: 30ml vodka, 15ml elderflower cordial or St-Germain Elderflower Liqueur, Champagne to top

Method: Put the vodka and elderflower cordial (or liqueur) into a cocktail shaker. Fill half way with ice and shake until your hands are cold. Strain into a chilled coupe and top with Champagne. Garnish with a lemon twist.


La Dolce Vita

A recipe from Bar Manager Francesca Orefici at Bar 45 (45 Park Lane), where they use Ruinart rosé Champagne for the La Dolce Vita cocktail.

Glass: Tall coupe glass

Garnish: Lemon twist

Ingredients: Two drops Rhubarb bitter, 10ml Yuzu Juice, 15ml Mandarin Napoleon,  30ml Italicus liquor, 30ml rosé Champagne

Method: Pour all the ingredients into the mixing glass with some ice cubes, stir for a few seconds, use a julep strainer into the mixing glass and strain the cocktail into a tall coupe glass with a little chunk of ice. Lemon twist on the top.


Millionaire’s Martini

With origins in 19th-century saloons, this Champagne-featuring Martini is a throwback to the Gilded Age. Recipe from the Sipsmith book SIP: 100 Gin Cocktails with Only Three Ingredients. 

Glass: Coupe

Garnish: Lemon twist

Ingredients: 40ml London Dry Gin, 40 ml dry vermouth, Champagne

Method: Combine the gin and vermouth in an ice-filled mixing glass and stir until properly chilled. Strain into a chilled coupe glass and top with Champagne.


You might also like:

Best Gins for a Negroni

Best whiskies for an Old Fashioned 

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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Laurel Gray Vineyards

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