Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
mulled wine

How to make your best mulled wine, with some expert advice....

The post Mulled wine recipe - Ask Decanter appeared first on Decanter.


mulled wine

How to make your best mulled wine, with some expert advice....

The post Mulled wine recipe - Ask Decanter appeared first on Decanter.

mulled wine

‘I’m not sure there’s an ‘ultimate’ recipe – it’s a question of personal taste,’ said Fiona Beckett in Decanter magazine in 2015, who shares her own recipe for mulled wine below.

‘Remember not to boil the liquid at any point, otherwise you’ll burn off the alcohol and make your mulled wine taste bitter.’

What wine for mulled wine

‘Make sure you’re not mulling one of the finest bottles in your cellar – which I’m sure you’re not’, said Beckett, who recommends going for a medium bodied red wine. 

‘A drinkable if inexpensive wine for a base – something like an own-label Corbières is ideal.’

Christophe Lechavlier from Borough Wines agrees that a medium bodied wine works well for a lighter mulled wine.

‘You could go for something a bit chunkier – a Syrah for example – which will bulk up the mulled wine’ he told Decanter.com in a video below.

‘You’re going to cook the wine remember, so you don’t want to spend too much, but you do want good quality.’

Other spirits

‘I personally think you need to add something sweet like a good slug of vintage character or late bottled vintage Port, or a dash of Grand Marnier or Cointreau,’ said Beckett.

Lechavlier also suggests a smokey whisky, brandy or rum as additions, but advises that you add a shot after you’ve made the mulled wine.

Spices

‘I also try to keep most of my spices whole, otherwise the mulled wine can taste powdery – so use cinnamon sticks rather than ground cinnamon, for example’ said Beckett. She uses cinnamon sticks, cardamom pods, nutmeg and a clove-studded orange in her recipe below.

‘It’s down to imagination,’ said Lechavlier. ‘You could try cinnamon, aniseed, nutmeg – even vanilla.’


Fiona Beckett’s mulled wine recipe

To serve 8-10

Ingredients

  • 2 bottles medium-bodied red wine
  • 1 unwaxed orange studded with 6 cloves
  • a few strips of zest from an unwaxed lemon
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 6 cardamom pods, lightly crushed
  • a little freshly grated nutmeg
  • 100g soft brown sugar
  • 100ml orange liqueur
  • a few orange slices

Method

  1. Pour the wine into a large saucepan and add 500ml cold water
  2. Add the orange and lemon zest, spices and sugar and heat gently until almost boiling
  3. Reduce the heat as low as possible – the liquid should barely tremble – and simmer for about 30 minutes so the spices infuse
  4. Add the orange liqueur and orange slices and reheat without boiling
  5. Ladle into small cups or glasses to serve

Video: How to make mulled wine

Video made in 2014. 

The post Mulled wine recipe - Ask Decanter appeared first on Decanter.


Read full article on decanter.com


Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Laurel Gray Vineyards

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