Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
English wine exports

Japan is one of the fastest-growing destinations for UK wine...

The post World gets a taste for English wine as exports soar appeared first on Decanter.


English wine exports

Japan is one of the fastest-growing destinations for UK wine...

The post World gets a taste for English wine as exports soar appeared first on Decanter.

English wine exports

Exports of UK wine doubled from 2018 to 2019 to around 550,000 bottles, said trade body WineGB and the Department for International Trade today (8 September).

That is still small compared to Champagne or Prosecco, but it shows how wine lovers around the world have developed an interest in the burgeoning English and Welsh wine scene.

Exports constituted one tenth of the total 5.5m bottles of UK wine sold in 2019, with Norway, the US, Canada and Australia the four biggest destinations.

Sparkling styles have led the way and UK government officials highlighted English wine as a success story that could benefit from post-Brexit trade deals being negotiated with several countries.

One of those countries is Japan, which is already the third largest export market for Champagne and is now one of the fastest growing markets for UK wines, accounting for 6% of exports by volume in 2019.

Graham Stuart, UK minister for exports, said, ‘A self-confident English wine industry will be in pole position to take advantage of a future trade deal with Japan and capitalise on other agreements we will sign in the Asia-Pacific region, and across the world.’

Gusbourne Estate, based in Kent, south-east England, recently signed a deal with Japan Airways, which will see its sparkling wines sold in first-class lounges.

Balfour Hush Heath Estate, also based in Kent, will also see its wines sold by Japanese importer and distributor 21 Community, after receiving help from the UK government in organising meetings with potential partners.

Adam Williams, the winery’s sales director, said, ‘Seeing our wines in so many different countries is extremely exciting and although exporting currently represents a small part of our overall sales, they are growing significantly every year as the awareness and interest in English wines continues to grow.’

WineGB said the long-term outlook for UK wine producers was positive, despite the uncertainty and financial challenges created by the Covid pandemic in 2020.

Simon Robinson, the trade group’s chairman, said, ‘We obviously cannot overlook the seismic changes everyone has experienced this year due to COVID-19, which will no doubt be reflected in our next industry report.

‘This year has inevitably brought serious setbacks, but the industry has reacted nimbly to address the issues and as a result we have also seen significant developments in direct to consumer sales and increased growth through the UK retail sector; we therefore remain broadly positive for the future.’

Vineyard land has expanded by 150% in the last decade and a quarter of respondents to WineGB’s recent trade survey said they planned to plant more vines in the next three years.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Laurel Gray Vineyards

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