Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
Fine Wine Partners vineyard

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The post Fine Wine Partners: The DNA of premium Australian wine in four estates appeared first on Decanter.


Fine Wine Partners vineyard

Promotional feature.

The post Fine Wine Partners: The DNA of premium Australian wine in four estates appeared first on Decanter.

Fine Wine Partners vineyard

Grant Burge, St Hallett, House of Arras and Petaluma are key players in Australia’s winemaking history. These premium estates are part of Accolade’s Fine Wine Partners, and their wines should be staples in any wine lover’s cellar.

In 1838, 11 years before the first Shiraz vines were planted in South Australia’s Barossa Valley, the Linder family was making fortified wine from a shed under the St Hallett name. For its 182 years since, the winery has been owned or part owned by a member of that family.

In the same year the Bordelais were ranking the 1855 Médoc Classification, the Burge family landed in the Barossa from England and began to make wine. Five generations later, Grant Burge (born 1951) shaped another of the valley’s leading estates. Not forgetting his family’s heritage, Grant named his top Shiraz after his great grandfather, Meshach. It is a wine collectors’ favourite and rated ‘Outstanding’ in Langton’s Classification of Australian wine.

One of the many advantages of the long history the Burge and Linder families enjoy in the Barossa is access to old vines. St Hallett’s Blackwell Shiraz and Grant Burge’s Meshach are testament to this, with 100% of the fruit coming from vines planted by generations before – some vines dating back 134 years, to 1886.

Roughly an hour’s drive south of the Barossa is the Adelaide Hills, where Brian Croser established Petaluma in 1976. Over the next 25 years Croser built up this estate to one of Australia’s most recognisable names, and was inducted into the Decanter Hall of Fame in 2004 due in large part to the exceptional wines he made here. Petaluma’s Yellow Label Coonawarra Cabernet blend has been ranked ‘Excellent’ by Langton’s, and the Chardonnays – particularly the single- vineyard Tiers and Piccadilly Valley bottlings – are much sought after.

Last but by no means least, House of Arras is part of modern Tasmanian winemaking history – the culmination of more than three decades of Ed Carr’s commitment to producing the highest quality sparkling wine. Carr, Australia’s most awarded sparkling winemaker, sources cool-climate fruit from the island’s south and east coasts and prioritises lengthy lees ageing in bottle. House of Arras has become Australia’s most awarded sparkling wine, rivalling the best in the world.

The highly anticipated release window of August to November is sure to have fine wine lovers around the world eager to secure an allocation of these estates’ top wines. Registering interest is strongly advised due to production levels. Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


St Hallett, Blackwell Shiraz, Barossa Valley, South Australia 2015

93 points, Huon Hooke, tasted in 2018

Deep, inky, dark chocolate and earthy bouquet. Black fruits are there but submerged. The palate is firm and quite high in tannins, while the finish rolls on and on. A deep, intense Barossa Shiraz with a full body and chunky structure.


Grant Burge, Meshach, Barossa Valley, South Australia 2012

95 points, Gold at Decanter World Wine Awards 2019

Cooked dark fruit and violet aromas. Flavours of ripe dark plums and cherries with velvety tannins, plus juicy and fresh acidity to balance. Developing beautifully with much more to come.


Petaluma, Yellow Label Chardonnay, Piccadilly Valley, Adelaide Hills, South Australia 2016

92 points, Tina Gellie, tasted for Decanter in 2020

An enduring name from the high-altitude, cool-climate Piccadilly Valley. Beautifully fresh and lively, with piercing acidity on an elegant palate of crisp green apple, meadow flowers and aromatic herbs.


House of Arras, EJ Carr Late Disgorged, Tasmania 2004

98 points, Susie Barrie MW, tasted for Decanter in 2019

A truly magnificent wine. Incredibly fresh for its age, it is intensely savoury, with notes of truffle, cream and lemon curd. Long, with the capacity to age for several years, this is a special occasion wine with a price-tag to match.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Laurel Gray Vineyards

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