Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
cru bourgeois 2005

Is now the time to enjoy these wines?

The post Opening cru bourgeois 2005 wines - Ask Decanter appeared first on Decanter.


cru bourgeois 2005

Is now the time to enjoy these wines?

The post Opening cru bourgeois 2005 wines - Ask Decanter appeared first on Decanter.

cru bourgeois 2005

Steve Garrett, by email, asks: When 2005 was touted as the best Bordeaux vintage since 1963, I ferreted away as many bottles as I could afford from trips to France. Not first to third growths, but the lower levels of the ladder: cru bourgeois châteaux such as Caronne Ste-Gemme, Meyney and Le Boscq.

I have dipped an occasional toe in the water with the odd bottle, but mainly resisted the temptation to dive in. Should I now take the plunge? Are these modest Bordeaux wines still in need of time, peaking or past their best?

Jane Anson, a Decanter contributing editor and our Bordeaux correspondent, replies: You definitely picked a brilliant vintage for long-ageing wines, and even at cru bourgeois level these should still be tasting excellent and not past their prime.

This wouldn’t be true, by the way, in the smaller appellations like the Côtes, where wines are almost always better to be drunk in the first 10 years after bottling, even in great vintages such as 2005.

I would, however, definitely start opening and enjoying them now, as they should be at their peak. Good Bordeaux can always surprise you with how long it can age, especially Cabernet-dominant wines from the Left Bank as you have here, but you’ll get great pleasure from these wines now.

This question first appeared in the June 2020 issue of Decanter magazine. Look out for Jane Anson’s feature on the new cru bourgeois 2020 ranking in the September 2020 issue of Decanter.


See also:

Anson – New cru bourgeois ranking: Will it hold up?

Bordeaux first growths: How does the 2000 vintage taste now?

The post Opening cru bourgeois 2005 wines - Ask Decanter appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Laurel Gray Vineyards

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