Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
wine label translator

The app will translate wine bottle labels into any language...

The post New app says it will translate wine labels appeared first on Decanter.


wine label translator

The app will translate wine bottle labels into any language...

The post New app says it will translate wine labels appeared first on Decanter.

wine label translator

Third Aurora, a Melbourne-based company, has launched a new artificial intelligence (AI) application that it said can translate wine bottle labels into any language.

The app can also translate tasting notes, videos and a variety of other promotions, according to Dave Chaffey, the company’s director.

Field tests were set to begin later this month, involving 88 wineries based in several countries, from big producer nations like Australia and the US to producers in Lebanon and Israel.

It will, eventually, be able to function in more than 100 languages, according to Chaffey, who hopes the app will connect with new consumers and appeal to new markets.


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What the industry says

Several wine industry experts were not impressed with the app, however.

Advances in AI and artificial reality (AR) may render some of the current technology—like this app—obsolete, they believe.

‘This technology doesn’t impress me,’ said Steve Raye, the New York City-based president of Bevology, a consulting company for wine and spirits brands. ‘I think it’s just a build on label recognition technology and not a very creative one at that.’

He added that he sees it as a way of ‘leveraging existing technology for a simple, singular use.’

He believes that Napa-based Treasury Wine Estates, which launched the interactive 19 Crimes Australian label two years ago, brought much more to the table, because ‘they added branding value coupled with a way of animating a marketing message.’

‘Most producers recognise they have to revise, or create, a new front label for the US market,’ he said.  ‘I don’t think “foreign wording” on a label is a problem to begin with [given that] many suppliers include foreign words [such as mise en bouteille au Château] to reinforce the concept that they are imported and from a particular place.’

However, he said the app could have ‘more value in countries where the customer traditionally only speaks and reads one language’.

Paul Mabray, the CEO of the Napa-based Emetry.io, which provides data to the wine industry, said that this application seemed to be ‘primarily a producer tool [albeit one that’s] great for wineries that export especially to countries like China’.

He added that technology like this will ‘soon become obsolete as [regular phone] cameras layer in artificial reality [AR] and we become more of a mixed reality society.’

However, he added that there is no doubt that this ‘is a welcome addition to the AR mix for wineries. Anything that helps communicate a story is good for the wine industry.’

Chaffey added that he hopes the next layer that will be added to the technology will include ‘an AI-driven sommelier to the experience [that would allow] consumers to ask questions.’

The post New app says it will translate wine labels appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Laurel Gray Vineyards

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