Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
Canned Wine
egwineco.com

How good are they..?

The post How good is canned wine? appeared first on Decanter.


Canned Wine
egwineco.com

How good are they..?

The post How good is canned wine? appeared first on Decanter.

Canned Wine
egwineco.com

There are a number of advantages to canned wine, and it is currently enjoying increasing popularity in the United States, where it is seeing healthy sales.

This market started some years ago, with established wine companies such as the Francis Ford Coppola Winery producing ‘Sofia’ Blanc de Blancs sparkling wine in cans in 2004.


Scroll down to see Eduardo’s top canned wine recommendations


To date a number of wineries have contributed to the canned-wine world; in many ways elevating the quality and perception of the product.

‘Most canned wines on the market did not have a vintage, were not variety specific and did not come from a specific AVA or even vineyard. We wanted to show that you can put high-end wines in alternative packaging, and that they taste exactly same as they would coming from a bottle,’ explains Gina Schober from Sans Wine.

‘There are a number of benefits when opting for cans instead of glass bottles – lower carbon footprint by reducing weight and promoting more efficient recycling are just the start,’ say Matthew Allan and Kenny Rochford from West + Wilder.

‘In some ways it’s easy and non-pretentious to consume wine from a can,’ declares Sean Larkin, winemaker and proprietor of Larkin Wines.

‘More retailers are now stocking wine in cans in the UK,’ said Andy Howard MW in the August issue of Decanter.

Waitrose, Tesco, Sainsbury’s and the Co-op have increased their range, while English wine is also getting in on the act with brands such as The Uncommon Bacchus.’

Another advantage of canned wine is faster chilling. This makes cans a good choice for picnics, concerts in the park and drinking by the pool, where glass is most likely prohibited.

The canned beverage industry has grown in many directions from canned cocktails to canned sake and, of course, several types of craft beer. The challenge is to prove that canned wine can exceed consumer expectations, with an exceptional glass of wine re-educating the way people drink.

Some canned wines demand prices upwards of $25 per 37.5cl can (equivalent to half a bottle of wine) such as Sans Wine Company Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, while the average price of most is around $5.

The varieties available in the marketplace are also quite diverse; from a number of rosés from Pinot Noir and Rhône to a good amount of sparkling or carbonated examples. Pinot Grigio goes all the way to red blends and Cabernet Sauvignon.

‘Another major advantage of cans is a reduced carbon footprint – aluminium has far higher recycling rates than glass, and the carbon effect of shipping lighter containers is significant,’ said Howard.

Although an exciting trend, there are a few important facts to consider, like ageability. When asked, producers mostly agree that canned wine is designed to be consumed soon after buying.

Another recommendation from producers is for consumers not to drink straight from the can but to drink out of a glass or plastic wine glass.

When asked about some of the challenges of this growing segment, Tony McClung, president of wine-industry consulting firm AMC Insights notes, ‘The production side is a large puzzle. The pieces include the can producer, the canning facility, the packaging company, the winery, the shipping company and the distribution network. All these pieces have not yet caught up to the demand.’

Talking about the all-important consumer demographic he said, ‘As we skew towards a younger generation, the market for alternative packaging will grow. They will then embrace the idea of wine in a can as they get older.’

There seems to be no stopping this nearly $50-million business that shows promising developments and considerable options for producers and consumers alike.


Top canned wine picks:

Wines tasted by Eduardo Dingler and James Button. 


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The post How good is canned wine? appeared first on Decanter.


Read full article on decanter.com


Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.