Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.
New world Nebbiolo
Nebbiolo grapes.

Where can you find Nebbiolo made in countries other than Italy...?

The post Nebbiolo beyond Italy – Ask Decanter appeared first on Decanter.


New world Nebbiolo
Nebbiolo grapes.

Where can you find Nebbiolo made in countries other than Italy...?

The post Nebbiolo beyond Italy – Ask Decanter appeared first on Decanter.

New world Nebbiolo
Nebbiolo grapes.

Fiona MacPherson, by email, asks: I really enjoyed Susan Hulme MW’s article on ‘Barolo alternatives’ (May 2019 issue), and look forward to sampling a few of these Nebbiolos. I notice, though, that these wines are all from northwest Italy. Surely there must be producers in other parts of the world who are growing Nebbiolo? Can you name any interesting ones to try?

Stephen Brook, a Decanter contributing editor since 1996, replies: Burgundy-loving winemakers the world over yearn to make fine Pinot Noir, so it’s not surprising that Italy-besotted winemakers want to try their hand at the even trickier Nebbiolo.

High in tannin, acidity and alcohol, Nebbiolo is hard to get right in its native Italy, and can frustrate even the most skilled winemakers elsewhere. Californian writer Norm Roby described it as: ‘Pinot Noir with a bad attitude’. In Washington state two growers planted it: Mike Sauer in 1985 and then David Gelles. Results have been patchy, to put it kindly.

Nebbiolo has fared better in California, and Randall Grahm at Ca’ del Solo has made some impressive examples, as has Renwood in the Sierra Foothills and Palmina in Santa Barbara.

Steenberg in Constantia, South Africa, has produced some decent Nebbiolos, but Australia, especially Victoria, shows the greatest promise. Castagna, Jasper Hill, and Pizzini have all released well-balanced wines, though Rick Kinzbrunner at Giaconda admits it took him years to master Nebbiolo. (For more on this, see ‘Italy in Australia’, in the upcoming June 2019 issue).

With northern Italy offering the ideal sweet spot for this finicky variety, this may be a challenge too far in other growing areas.

This question first appeared in the June 2019 issue of Decanter magazine.


See also: Australian wines from Italian grape varieties

See more wine questions here

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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Laurel Gray Vineyards

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