Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

How it differs from other styles and expert advice on how to make an alternative version of a gin & tonic.

white Port
White Port and tonic at Bar Douro.

White Port and tonic anyone?...

The post What is white Port? – ask Decanter appeared first on Decanter.


How it differs from other styles and expert advice on how to make an alternative version of a gin & tonic.

white Port
White Port and tonic at Bar Douro.

White Port and tonic anyone?...

The post What is white Port? – ask Decanter appeared first on Decanter.

How it differs from other styles and expert advice on how to make an alternative version of a gin & tonic.

white Port
White Port and tonic at Bar Douro.

What is white Port? – ask Decanter

White Port is made from white grapes, such as Códega, Malvasia Fina, Rabigato and Viosinho.

‘Most are bottled young but some whites are capable of wood age and may now be bottled with the same age indications as tawny Ports or as a colheita,’ said Richard Mayson, in his guide to Port styles.

It is a refreshing and light style, making it ideal for summer drinking. It tends to have flavours of apricot, citrus fruit and peel, and nuts.

‘The dry style is a versatile style of port which can be served chilled as an aperitif, mixed with tonic or as a base for cocktails,’ said Max Graham, owner of Portuguese restaurant Bar Douro.


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How to make a white Port and tonic

White Port can be used as a lower-alcohol alternative to gin, mixed with tonic.

Graham recommends mixing ‘50ml of Churchill’s dry white Port, 100ml of tonic water [he prefers Fevertree], orange peel and a sprig of mint to garnish. Pour all into a glass with ice cubes and stir well.’

Other citrus peel works well, but ‘the orange peel is reminiscent of the orange grove at Churchill’s Quinta da Gricha in the Douro’, said Graham.

Clement Robert MS recommends fortified wines in wine cocktails because ‘they are lighter than liqueurs and spirits but they have the necessary strength to give the whole drink a delicious lift.’


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.