Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

Codorníu Raventós has said it is in exclusive talks to sell control of its business to a European division of the Carlyle Group, the US-based private equity firm that also bought Hardys owner Accolade Wines via its Asia subsidiary earlier this year.

Codorníu
Codorníu cellars in Catalonia.

Private equity firm in exclusive talks to buy majority stake in Cava giant...

The post Cava maker Codorníu Raventós close to takeover deal with Carlyle Group appeared first on Decanter.


Codorníu Raventós has said it is in exclusive talks to sell control of its business to a European division of the Carlyle Group, the US-based private equity firm that also bought Hardys owner Accolade Wines via its Asia subsidiary earlier this year.

Codorníu
Codorníu cellars in Catalonia.

Private equity firm in exclusive talks to buy majority stake in Cava giant...

The post Cava maker Codorníu Raventós close to takeover deal with Carlyle Group appeared first on Decanter.

Codorníu Raventós has said it is in exclusive talks to sell control of its business to a European division of the Carlyle Group, the US-based private equity firm that also bought Hardys owner Accolade Wines via its Asia subsidiary earlier this year.

Codorníu
Codorníu cellars in Catalonia.

Codorníu Raventós Group, one of Spain’s major Cava sparkling wine producers, said that it was discussing selling a majority stake in its business to ‘funds managed by the Carlyle Group’. It added that investment would come from Carlyle Europe Partners.

Based on recent talks, the deal would value Codorníu at 390 million euros. The precise size of the potential stake to be sold was not disclosed.

A sale was expected to complete by the end of 2018, subject to due diligence and regulatory approval, Codorníu said.

Mar Raventós, chairwoman of Codorníu, said that she was pleased with the preliminary agreement made with Carlyle Europe Partners.

‘This agreement will help boost the company overseas and consolidate and give continuity to our strategy centered on building valuable and prestigious brands.’

She added, ‘After analysing various options we have reached consensus, agreeing on a solution which has a lot of potential and takes a long-term view on leadership for the company.’

Codorníu Raventós Group said it expected to make operating profits, or EBITDA, of 26 million euros in its current financial year, which it described as a ‘significant improvement on the previous year’s results.’

Codorníu Raventós has 10 wineries in Spain, Argentina and California, and more than 3,000 hectares of vineyards.

If the deal goes ahead then it would be the second large wine acquisition associated with the Carlyle Group in 2018.

In April, Champ private equity and Constellation Brands announced the sale of Hardys owner Accolade Wines to the Carlyle Group in a deal worth one billion Australian dollars.

Funding for that deal came from Carlyle Asia Partners and the takeover completed on 1 June.


See also: First Cava ‘grand cru’ sites are chosen

The post Cava maker Codorníu Raventós close to takeover deal with Carlyle Group appeared first on Decanter.


Read full article on decanter.com


Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.