Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

Pol Roger has excavated some long-lost treasure from the wreckage of a cellar that collapsed in 1900 and buried more than a million bottles of Champagne.

Pol Roger discovers
Some of the 20 bottles of Champagne that have been unearthed, dated between 1887 and 1898. Credit: Champagne Pol Roger

Find out what was unearthed from the 118-year-old cellar ruins...

The post Pol Roger unearths long-lost 19th century Champagne appeared first on Decanter.


Pol Roger has excavated some long-lost treasure from the wreckage of a cellar that collapsed in 1900 and buried more than a million bottles of Champagne.

Pol Roger discovers
Some of the 20 bottles of Champagne that have been unearthed, dated between 1887 and 1898. Credit: Champagne Pol Roger

Find out what was unearthed from the 118-year-old cellar ruins...

The post Pol Roger unearths long-lost 19th century Champagne appeared first on Decanter.

Pol Roger has excavated some long-lost treasure from the wreckage of a cellar that collapsed in 1900 and buried more than a million bottles of Champagne.

Pol Roger discovers
Some of the 20 bottles of Champagne that have been unearthed, dated between 1887 and 1898. Credit: Champagne Pol Roger

Pol Roger discovers ‘intact’ Champagne from cellar ruins

Almost 118 years ago, on 23 February 1900, disaster struck Pol Roger’s cellars in Épernay.

Following a period of extreme cold and damp, vast stretches of wall suddenly collapsed during the night, demolishing adjoining buildings and burying 1.5 million bottles of wine, along with 500 casks.


  • A Charles Heidsieck tasting to remember: the Collection Crayères


Damage was so extensive that the ground above the cellars caved in, causing the street level to fall by four metres. Great fissures formed in the nearby roads, rue Henri le Large and rue Godart-Roger.

An account from Le Vigneron Champenois tells how Pol Roger’s son Maurice awoke at 2am to ‘a dull rumble similar to the sound of thunder’.

‘When the workers arrived a few hours later, the disaster was complete.’

Pol Roger discover

In 1900 the cellar walls caved in, demolishing buildings and cracking nearby roads… Credit: Champagne Pol Roger

Pol Roger’s sons, Maurice and Georges, had hoped they could attempt to salvage the buried wines by tunnelling into the rubble.

But after a similar cave-in occurred a month later at the nearby property of Godart-Roger, the plans were abandoned, along with the ruined cellars.

Fast forward almost 118 years exactly and Pol Roger is now rebuilding a new packaging facility on the same plot of land.

On 15 January, a drilling session hit upon an underground chamber, which contained a cache of broken glass and an intact bottle of Champagne.

Pol Roger discover

‘These bottles are still on their lees and will have to be hand riddled and disgorged before being tasted.’ Credit: Champagne Pol Roger

After further excavation, 19 more bottles were lifted unscathed from the wreckage.

‘The wines are clear, the levels are correct and the corks are depressed,’ said the Champagne house.

‘These bottles are still on their lees and will have to be hand riddled and disgorged before being tasted.’

The exact age of the bottles is hard to determine, but Pol Roger has confirmed they will be of vintages between 1887 and 1898.

The discovery was made by Dominic Petit, Pol Roger’s chef de cave of 19 years, and the man who will succeed him in April, Damien Cambres.

Wet weather has prevented Petit and Cambres from unearthing more of the cellars’ contents so far.


Related content:

  • Wine Legend: Pol Roger, Cuvée Sir Winston Churchill 2000

  • No Château Climens 2017 due to frost damage

  • Ten great restaurants in Champagne for wine lovers

The post Pol Roger unearths long-lost 19th century Champagne appeared first on Decanter.


Read full article on decanter.com


Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.