Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

Scotland may be better known for its whisky than wine, but that hasn’t stopped these Scots venturing to more reliable wine regions down through the centuries. Read more below and find a wine for the night itself…

Scotland has more influence on wine than you'd think...

The post Burns Night: Scotland’s wine pioneers appeared first on Decanter.


Scotland may be better known for its whisky than wine, but that hasn’t stopped these Scots venturing to more reliable wine regions down through the centuries. Read more below and find a wine for the night itself…

Scotland has more influence on wine than you'd think...

The post Burns Night: Scotland’s wine pioneers appeared first on Decanter.

Scotland may be better known for its whisky than wine, but that hasn’t stopped these Scots venturing to more reliable wine regions down through the centuries. Read more below and find a wine for the night itself…

As Julian Hitner writes in ‘How Britain Shaped the Wine World’, Scottish entrepreneurs were strongly involved in the Bordeaux wine trade.

Early négociants such as Scottish-born William Johnston played a key role in promulgating many of the most important technological advances of the 18th century, most of which are still in use today, says Hitner.

These include the use of sulphur as a disinfectant (a Dutch invention), topping up, racking, using egg whites as a fining agent and using barriques for top wines. Only later did winegrowers in the region adopt these advancements directly.

Below, we look at more examples of Scottish influence on winemaking.


See also: Wines and whiskies to match with haggis on Burns Night


Château Smith Haut Lafitte

Smith Haut Lafitte, Burns night wine

Bordeaux and Scotland have deep historical links. The Graves estate Château Smith Haut Laffite was purchased by Scottish man George Smith in 1720 – where the ‘Smith’ in the name comes from – and he is credited with developing the estate.


  • Will we be drinking Scottish Pinot Grigio by 2100? 


Cockburn’s Port

Burns night wines

Credit: Cockburn Port Instagram

Cockburn’s Port was founded in 1815 by Scotsman Robert Cockburn and his brother John, who were already wine merchants in Leith, Scotland. The Cockburn family continued to run the company for many years, and it is now owned by the Symington family.

MacLaren Wine

MacLaren Wine, Burns night wine

Steve Law is making Syrah in Sonoma. Law is originally from Scotland, but he lived in France and learnt about wine. He took his inspiration to California in 2007 and started making Northern Rhône-style Syrah.

El Escocés Volante

Born and bred in Scotland, Norrel Robertson MW moved to Spain in 2003 to produce his own wine – aptly named El Escocés Volante; ‘The Flying Scot’ in Spanish.


  • Scotland’s ‘undrinkable’ wine has promise – producer


Gladstone Vineyard

Gladstone Vineyard, burns night wine

Christine Kernohan set up Gladstone Vineyard in Wairapara, New Zealand, in 1996, producing the ‘12,000 Miles’ range – named for her distance from her home of Glasgow, with a luggage label as part of the design.

McCulloch Wines

McCulloch Wines, burns night wines

Scottish winemaker and oenologist, Jamie S. McCulloch, moved to Valais in Switzerland to start making wine in 2007. He makes a range of six wines.

Wines from Scottish pioneers:

 


 

Updated in January 2018 with wines to try.

The post Burns Night: Scotland’s wine pioneers appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.