Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

Thieves operating in the dead of night have stolen 1,000 bottles of Brunello di Montalcino from high profile estate Col d'Orcia, including 'irreplaceable' library vintages.

col d'orcia, stolen brunello
The Col d'Orcia estate. south of Montalcino.

'Irreplaceable' library wines stolen at Col d'Orcia...

The post Thieves steal 1,000 Brunello wines from Col D’Orcia appeared first on Decanter.


Thieves operating in the dead of night have stolen 1,000 bottles of Brunello di Montalcino from high profile estate Col d'Orcia, including 'irreplaceable' library vintages.

col d'orcia, stolen brunello
The Col d'Orcia estate. south of Montalcino.

'Irreplaceable' library wines stolen at Col d'Orcia...

The post Thieves steal 1,000 Brunello wines from Col D’Orcia appeared first on Decanter.

Thieves operating in the dead of night have stolen 1,000 bottles of Brunello di Montalcino from high profile estate Col d'Orcia, including 'irreplaceable' library vintages.

col d'orcia, stolen brunello
The Col d'Orcia estate. south of Montalcino.

Around 100,000 euros-worth of Brunello di Montalcino wines were stolen from the Col d’Orcia wine shop, situated on the winery estate, last weekend, according to the winery.

Thieves broke into the shop overnight and took around 1,000 Brunello wines, including library vintages dating back to 1964 and also highly rated wines such as Poggio al Vento Riserva 1997 and 1999.

‘Some of the bottles are irreplaceable,’ said Francesco Marone Cinzano, owner of Col d’Orcia, who was sleeping in the next-door building at the time of the burglary.

‘They only took the Brunello and everything in the shop was very tidy and clean. They had strict instructions,’ he told Decanter.com.

A van stolen from Col d’Orcia and used as a getaway vehicle was found last night (Thursday 25 January) in Perugia, but no wines were inside.

Police have called in forensics experts to look for clues and a network of merchants, retailers and importers globally have been notified to look for suspect bottles.

‘A lot of merchants have sent messages of sympathy and promised to be on the lookout,’ Cinzano said.

There have been several other burglaries of private apartments in the Montalcino area in recent weeks, according to Cinzano, but it is not known whether they are connected.

There is a plan to set up 110 CCTV cameras this year in the municipality, in order to deter and detect thieves. ‘They will cover entrances and exits to main roads, and they will be able to read car number plates,’ said Cinzano who is one of those who has worked on the initiative with authorities.

There is a sense that fine wine thefts have become a growing problem for high profile wineries and restaurants worldwide in recent years, from California to Bordeaux.

Some have linked this to rapid price inflation for the world’s top wines in the last two decades.


See also:

  • Tasting note: Col d’Orcia’s 2012 vintage Brunello di Montalcino 

  • The making of Montalcino – by Monty Waldin

  • Thieves use Paris catacombs to steal fine wines

The post Thieves steal 1,000 Brunello wines from Col D’Orcia appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.