Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

See Burgundy 2016 wines rated above 95 points by William Kelley, following extensive tasting in the region ahead of the coming en primeur campaign by merchants in early 2018.

Burgundy 2016 wines
William Kelley spent several weeks on the road, tasting Burgundy 2016 en primeur wines.

Get ahead for the coming en primeur campaign...

The post Best Burgundy 2016 wines: The top scorers appeared first on Decanter.


See Burgundy 2016 wines rated above 95 points by William Kelley, following extensive tasting in the region ahead of the coming en primeur campaign by merchants in early 2018.

Burgundy 2016 wines
William Kelley spent several weeks on the road, tasting Burgundy 2016 en primeur wines.

Get ahead for the coming en primeur campaign...

The post Best Burgundy 2016 wines: The top scorers appeared first on Decanter.

See Burgundy 2016 wines rated above 95 points by William Kelley, following extensive tasting in the region ahead of the coming en primeur campaign by merchants in early 2018.

Burgundy 2016 wines
William Kelley spent several weeks on the road, tasting Burgundy 2016 en primeur wines.

  • Scroll down to see William Kelley’s Burgundy 2016 wines over 95 points

  • Full, in-depth report coming soon


Brief overview

Burgundy 2016 will be at least partially remembered both inside and outside the region for the devastating frosts that struck many vineyards, including premier cru and grand cru sites, in late April of that year.

Few could remember frosts so bad. ‘I’ve never heard of Echezeaux freezing,’ Emmanuel Rouget told William Kelley, whose full Burgundy 2016 vintage report will be published online for Decanter Premium members soon.

Some wineries later saw frost damage compounded by mildew, and subsequently there will be even smaller-than-usual quantities of wine in the worst hit areas.

As is so often the case, damage was patchy and parts of Burgundy survived relatively unscathed. The bad weather has increased a sense of heterogeneity in the young wines from the vintage.

A warm and dry summer from mid-July onwards helped considerably during the growing season and, as a consequence, there are still superb wines to seek out, spanning different appellation levels and price tiers, writes Kelley.

Several top estates hit hard by weather conditions on some sites still performed well with their remaining crop, like Domaine Armand Rousseau, which lost around 60% of its 2016 harvest in Chambertin Grand Cru, Kelley writes.

Early signs suggest that this is more of a red Burgundy vintage than one to rival the very top years for white wines.

Kelley’s ratings show many wines above 95 points, but with fewer white wines making the cut at this level versus 2015, for example.

His top scoring wines of the vintage, shown below, are still expected to have significant life spans, stretching beyond three decades in several cases.


William Kelley’s top scoring Burgundy 2016 wines

 

  • You can also find the wines listed in our reviews section, here

 


 

Compare Burgundy 2016 with our en primeur scores from the 2015 vintage. See Burgundy 2015 scores here.


 

The post Best Burgundy 2016 wines: The top scorers appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.