Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

Stephen Brook attended the Louis Jadot masterclass at the recent Decanter Fine Wine Encounter in London and tasted vintages of its Clos Vougeot Grand Cru stretching back several decades. See his ratings on the wines.

Louis Jadot
Louis Jadot

Which ones to seek out...

The post Top Clos Vougeot wines from Louis Jadot appeared first on Decanter.


Stephen Brook attended the Louis Jadot masterclass at the recent Decanter Fine Wine Encounter in London and tasted vintages of its Clos Vougeot Grand Cru stretching back several decades. See his ratings on the wines.

Louis Jadot
Louis Jadot

Which ones to seek out...

The post Top Clos Vougeot wines from Louis Jadot appeared first on Decanter.

Stephen Brook attended the Louis Jadot masterclass at the recent Decanter Fine Wine Encounter in London and tasted vintages of its Clos Vougeot Grand Cru stretching back several decades. See his ratings on the wines.

Louis Jadot
Louis Jadot

Like many of the major négociant houses in Burgundy, Louis Jadot has extensive holdings of fine vineyards and thus acts as a domaine as well as a merchant, with eight Grands Crus among the 37 hectares it owns along the Côte d’Or.

Frédéric Barnier presented a splendid vertical tasting from the Clos Vougeot Grand Cru at the Decanter Fine Wine Encounter in London.

Barnier took over as technical director in 2012, succeeding the legendary and hugely admired Jacques Lardière on his retirement.

Lardière was keen on biodynamic farming, although Jadot has never made a great song and dance about it.

Article continues below the wines: Find out more about Jadot’s Clos Vougeot vines and winemaking principles.


Jadot Clos Vougeot ratings from this tasting

UK and US stockists given if available. Stockist search aided by Wine-Searcher


About Clos Vougeot

Clos Vougeot is the largest Grand Cru after the Cortons, with almost 51 hectares planted in a single block, but divided among over seventy proprietors.

The Clos differs from other Grands Crus in that its vineyards don’t just occupy the prized mid-slope of the Côte de Nuits, but descend as far as the road between Beaune and Dijon.

That means there are considerable variations in soil type.

Where Jadot’s vines lie

Barnier readily admitted that the Jadot holdings, which amount to a sizeable 2.6 hectares, are partly mid-slope but mostly at the foot of the slope. That lower section has more clay, and the soil is twice as deep as it is at the top of the Clos.

In Barnier’s view, that doesn’t mean the Jadot wine is lower in quality, but it does mean it is slower to evolve and does not become fully expressive until it is at least seven years old.

How Jadot Clos Vougeot is made

Most of the Jadot wines are made in the same way, and Clos Vougeot is no exception.

The grapes are fully destemmed, and fermented with indigenous yeasts. The maceration period is usually prolonged, and fermentation temperatures relatively high, which can also add to the tannic structure when the wine is young.

It is aged for around 18 months in one-third new oak. Very little press wine is blended in, and there is usually no filtration.

Clos Vougeot may not be the most prestigious of Jadot’s Grands Crus, but it is certainly consistent.

More about Louis Jadot

Since 1985, Jadot has been owned by the Kobrand wine and spirits distribution company in the United States, but the firm seems content to let Jadot produce its wines without interference.

The hereditary managers of the company are the Gagey family, now entering its third generation. Jadot also has a welcome tendency to keep its winemakers for decades, ensuring a consistency of style.

The post Top Clos Vougeot wines from Louis Jadot appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.