Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

Antonio Carluccio, who grew up in Piedmont and spent time as a wine importer before becoming better known as 'the godfather of Italian cooking' in Britain, has died aged 80.

antonio carluccio
Antonio Carluccio became the face of Italian cooking in the UK.

'Godfather' of Italian cooking in Britain has died...

The post Italian cooking maestro Antonio Carluccio dies appeared first on Decanter.


Antonio Carluccio, who grew up in Piedmont and spent time as a wine importer before becoming better known as 'the godfather of Italian cooking' in Britain, has died aged 80.

antonio carluccio
Antonio Carluccio became the face of Italian cooking in the UK.

'Godfather' of Italian cooking in Britain has died...

The post Italian cooking maestro Antonio Carluccio dies appeared first on Decanter.

Antonio Carluccio, who grew up in Piedmont and spent time as a wine importer before becoming better known as 'the godfather of Italian cooking' in Britain, has died aged 80.

antonio carluccio
Antonio Carluccio became the face of Italian cooking in the UK.

Carluccio’s agent announced on social media on Wednesday (8 November), ‘It is with great sadness that we announce that Commendatore Antonio Carluccio OBE sadly passed away this morning.’ He was 80 years old.

Carluccio spent much of his childhood in Piedmont, but despite his up-bringing in one of the bastions of Italian gastronomy he did not turn seriously to food and wine as a career until much later.

After an early professional life that included a stint as a wine importer in Hamburg, Germany, Carluccio found his gastronomic calling when he opened his Neal St restaurant in London in 1981.

Things took off from there, and Carluccio has since authored more than 20 books and become a household name in the UK on everything to do with Italian cooking. He also created the ‘Carluccio’s restaurant chain.

He helped to launch the career of Jamie Oliver, who worked at Neal St and was one of many chefs and celebrities to pay tribute to his late Italian mentor.

‘He was such a charismatic charming don of all things Italian!!’ said Oliver on Instagram.

Carluccio also had a passion for matching wines with food.

In 2003, in an article on how to match food with Barbera d’Asti wines, Carluccio told Decanter, ‘I like lamb with Barbera. A simple roast of young lamb with just a hint of garlic and rosemary, served pinkish with fresh asparagus, eaten with a bottle of Bava Stradivario 1997.’

During his time in the UK, Carluccio both witnessed and helped to propagate a shift in attitude towards Italian food and cooking in general.

He was also not afraid to voice opinions. In 2004, he criticised ‘Britalian’ food sold by UK supermarkets and created with cheap ingredients.

The post Italian cooking maestro Antonio Carluccio dies appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.