Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

After earlier careers in other fields, Baron Philippe de Rothschild’s three grandchildren have taken up roles in the family business. Jane Anson discovers how they plan to honour such a distinguished heritage...

Mouton Rothschild family
From left: Philippe Sereys de Rothschild, Camille Sereys de Rothschild & Julien de Beaumarchais de Rothschild

Jane Anson picks out wines for drinking now from the Rothschild portfolio...

The post The Decanter interview: Mouton Rothschild family: the new generation appeared first on Decanter.


After earlier careers in other fields, Baron Philippe de Rothschild’s three grandchildren have taken up roles in the family business. Jane Anson discovers how they plan to honour such a distinguished heritage...

Mouton Rothschild family
From left: Philippe Sereys de Rothschild, Camille Sereys de Rothschild & Julien de Beaumarchais de Rothschild

Jane Anson picks out wines for drinking now from the Rothschild portfolio...

The post The Decanter interview: Mouton Rothschild family: the new generation appeared first on Decanter.

After earlier careers in other fields, Baron Philippe de Rothschild’s three grandchildren have taken up roles in the family business. Jane Anson discovers how they plan to honour such a distinguished heritage...

Mouton Rothschild family
From left: Philippe Sereys de Rothschild, Camille Sereys de Rothschild & Julien de Beaumarchais de Rothschild

La Grande Piece at Mouton Rothschild, with its blue and red tiled floor, 17th and 18th century chairs and artworks including Brancusi’s Bird in Space sculpture, looks almost exactly as it did in a photo shoot for Vogue in 1963.

It has been left more or less untouched since Baron Philippe and his second wife, Baroness Pauline (described as a legendary tastemaker by Architectural Digest in 1977) carefully selected the pieces. Much of the rest of their collection is on display downstairs in the Museum of Wine in Art, but these are the private quarters.

Today, Baron Philippe’s grandson Philippe Sereys de Rothschild has chosen this room for our meeting, almost two years to the day since we first discussed his appointment as chairman of the supervisory board for the legendary Mouton Rothschild family estates.


Scroll down to see Jane’s picks of the Rothschild portfolio for drinking now


From that first meeting, on a beautifully sunny day in June 2015, I remember a clear impression forming of the serious challenge ahead in taking over from his mother, Baroness Philippine de Rothschild, who died less than a year earlier and left in her wake an indelible imprint on every part of her estate.

Two years on and Sereys de Rothschild is warm, expansive, relaxed. He seems fully grown into his role as the head of the board, working alongside his elder sister, Camille Sereys de Rothschild, and younger brother, Julien de Beaumarchais de Rothschild.


 

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The post The Decanter interview: Mouton Rothschild family: the new generation appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.