Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

His acclaimed wines command stratospheric prices on the secondary market, but the man in the driving seat at Domaine G Roumier is more concerned with looking after the land for the next generation, discovers Stephen Brook.

Jon-Wyand-Roumier
Jon-Wyand

The day before going to visit Christophe Roumier, I asked some of his neighbours what questions I should pose. The …Continue reading »

The post The Decanter Interview – Christophe Roumier appeared first on Decanter.


His acclaimed wines command stratospheric prices on the secondary market, but the man in the driving seat at Domaine G Roumier is more concerned with looking after the land for the next generation, discovers Stephen Brook.

Jon-Wyand-Roumier
Jon-Wyand

The day before going to visit Christophe Roumier, I asked some of his neighbours what questions I should pose. The …Continue reading »

The post The Decanter Interview – Christophe Roumier appeared first on Decanter.

His acclaimed wines command stratospheric prices on the secondary market, but the man in the driving seat at Domaine G Roumier is more concerned with looking after the land for the next generation, discovers Stephen Brook.

Jon-Wyand-Roumier
Jon-Wyand

The day before going to visit Christophe Roumier, I asked some of his neighbours what questions I should pose. The reply came as a chorus: ‘Ask him why he doesn’t reply to emails!’ Indeed, I too have long experienced the same problem.

The topic slipped my mind when I found myself in his modest office at Domaine G Roumier, his sister in the reception area, Roumier seated in shorts behind a crowded desk. That he produces magical wines, all agree. Yet it is clear there is no magic formula behind his success, but rather a combination of excellent vineyards, attention to detail, and finely tuned skills both in the vineyard and winery. He exudes modesty, but not false modesty, and seems genuinely bewildered by the soaring prices obtained by his wines on the secondary market.

‘Frankly, I’m puzzled by the stratospheric prices some of my wines have been fetching, as I’m not convinced they’re so much better than those from many of my neighbours.’

Yet bottles of his Chambolle-Musigny 1er Cru Amoureuses and Bonnes-Mares have been known to sell for between £1,400 and £1,800 each. Of course, such prices reflect scarcity as well as quality, not to mention the feeding frenzy of international collectors.

 

The post The Decanter Interview – Christophe Roumier appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.