Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

The Langton’s classification is arguably Australia’s best barometer of fine wine. Here, Sarah Ahmed picks her favourite wines from a tasting earlier this year.

Langton's
Some of the wines in the Langton's classification.

Australia's finest wines, by Sarah Ahmed...

The post Australia’s finest: Langton’s Top 40 appeared first on Decanter.


The Langton’s classification is arguably Australia’s best barometer of fine wine. Here, Sarah Ahmed picks her favourite wines from a tasting earlier this year.

Langton's
Some of the wines in the Langton's classification.

Australia's finest wines, by Sarah Ahmed...

The post Australia’s finest: Langton’s Top 40 appeared first on Decanter.

The Langton’s classification is arguably Australia’s best barometer of fine wine. Here, Sarah Ahmed picks her favourite wines from a tasting earlier this year.

Langton's
Some of the wines in the Langton's classification.

It’s been nearly 30 years since Australia-based auction house Langton’s began championing Australia’s finest wines by creating, in effect,  a more fluid equivalent of Bordeaux’s famed 1855 classification.

The Langton’s classification started in 1990 with only 39 wines, including just one ‘exceptional’ wine.

In 2010, that had grown to 123 wines, and today 21 wines are classed as  ‘exceptional’, the highest tier in the system.


  • Find out more about the Langton’s Classification: Australia’s fine wine ‘form guide’


Names such as Henschke’s Hill of Grace and Penfolds Grange have been stalwarts, yet as Australia’s fine wine scene has grown and adapted more styles have been added.

Shiraz is an obvious winner with unmistakable style and power, while Cabernet from Coonawarra has also excelled.

Alongside these are several examples of distinct cooler Rieslings of the Clare Valley, classic Semillon from the Hunter and both Chardonnay and Cabernet from Margaret River, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. Look out for more of those wines soon. But first…

Sarah Ahmed’s Top 40 from Langton’s

Tasting notes and ratings are only available to Decanter Premium members. Copy above written by Decanter staff. 

The post Australia’s finest: Langton’s Top 40 appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.