Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

It's not for everyone, but wine has its place in the cocktail culture that has grown up in major cities over the past few years. Here's some recipes from the organisers of upcoming London Cocktail Week and extra tips from 28-50's Clement Robert MS.

Wine cocktails
Scapigliato

Wine cocktails are continuing to grow in popularity...

The post Wine cocktails to try – London Cocktail Week appeared first on Decanter.


It's not for everyone, but wine has its place in the cocktail culture that has grown up in major cities over the past few years. Here's some recipes from the organisers of upcoming London Cocktail Week and extra tips from 28-50's Clement Robert MS.

Wine cocktails
Scapigliato

Wine cocktails are continuing to grow in popularity...

The post Wine cocktails to try – London Cocktail Week appeared first on Decanter.

It's not for everyone, but wine has its place in the cocktail culture that has grown up in major cities over the past few years. Here's some recipes from the organisers of upcoming London Cocktail Week and extra tips from 28-50's Clement Robert MS.

Wine cocktails
Scapigliato

Clement Robert, Master Sommelier at 28°-50° Maddox St says there are many advantages to using wine, rather than sprits.

‘The aromas are natural, they are lower in alcohol and more easy to digest.’

‘For example we serve an PXpresso Martini where we essentially replace the coffee liquor by some Pedro Ximenez wine, it gives the cocktail more freshness, higher complexity and it has less alcohol than a traditional Espresso Martini.’

  • ‘Frosé’ becomes latest summer wine trend

Choosing wine for a wine cocktail

‘Don’t use your Château Pétrus 1982,’ said Robert.

‘I like to use fortified wines, they are lighter than liqueurs and spirits but they have the necessary strength to give the whole drink a delicious lift.

‘For example, we use tawny Port in our Douro Breeze cocktail ; made of Graham’s tawny Port 10 years, grape juice, lemon and amaretto.

‘The taste reminds me of a Negroni cocktail with a wine and almond twist.’

Champagne cocktails

Robert recommends Champagne cocktails as the easiest to try making yourself.

‘You know roughly the result you are going to obtain as Champagne is brilliant at bringing out aromas and adds sparkle to the base ingredients you are using.

‘Try a Kir Imperial: Chambord, raspberry pue and Champagne.’

Wine cocktail recipes from London Cocktail Week

wine cocktails

The Fino Collins

Fino Collins:

75ml Tio Pepe Fino,
15ml elderflower cordial
25ml Cucumber
dash of lemon
Top with soda , garnish with a lemon wheel and cucumber slice
Available throughout LCW17 at Sack – 9 Christopher St, London EC2A 2BS

Tokyo Negroni:

35ml gin
20ml choya
15ml cocchi americano
2x dash white soy
Grated Tonka bean
Stirred and served in a rocks with ice

Available throughout LCW17 at Jamie Oliver’s Fifteen – 15 Westland Pl, London N1 7LP

Wine cocktails

Tokyo Negroni

Scapigliato:

20 ml Campari bitter
15 ml Stolichnaya vodka
15 ml Fiorente Italian elderflower liqueur
10 ml red wine reduction with cloves, cinnamon, star anise
Topped with Franciacorta and garnish with a flamed lemon peel

Available throughout LCW17 at Ritorno – 442 King’s Rd, Chelsea, London SW10 0LQ

Belle Helene:

40 ml of Camut Calvados
15 ml Manzana Verde
20 ml Lemon Juice
10 ml of sugar syrup
Egg white
Top up Gewürztraminer wine  and serve with a crystal pear garnish in a Riesling glass

Available throughout LCW17 at Bellanger – 9 Islington Green, London N1 2XH

Wine cocktails

Lady Marmalade

Lady Marmalade:

50ml Marsala
1 bar spoon shredless orange marmalade
20ml Lemon juice
15ml Sugar syrup
Shake & single strain, serve up in a coupe.

Available throughout LCW17 at Every Cloud – 11A Morning Ln, London E9 6ND

 

London Cocktail Week is 2 – 8th October 2017. Festival Passes are £10 and available from DrinkUp.London.

More stories:

  • Frosé recipe

  • Latest: Tasting notes decoded

  • How to combat ‘Prosecco teeth’ – ask Decanter

The post Wine cocktails to try – London Cocktail Week appeared first on Decanter.


Read full article on decanter.com


Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.