Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

The UK government has defended its record on English wine by saying that it buys more homegrown wines for its hospitality events than from any other nation.

UK government english wine
52 percent of bottles in the UK Government Wine Cellar are English wines.

Foreign Office says it backs the industry...

The post English wine makes up half of UK Government’s cellar purchases appeared first on Decanter.


The UK government has defended its record on English wine by saying that it buys more homegrown wines for its hospitality events than from any other nation.

UK government english wine
52 percent of bottles in the UK Government Wine Cellar are English wines.

Foreign Office says it backs the industry...

The post English wine makes up half of UK Government’s cellar purchases appeared first on Decanter.

The UK government has defended its record on English wine by saying that it buys more homegrown wines for its hospitality events than from any other nation.

UK government english wine
52 percent of bottles in the UK Government Wine Cellar are English wines.

Figures show that English wine accounted for 1,500 of the 3,052 bottles bought for the UK government’s hospitality cellar in the 2016/17 tax year, and that 52 per cent of wine consumed at ‘high profile receptions’ was English.

Ten years ago, just 20 per cent of wines served at these events were from England, said the Foreign Office, which manages the cellar.

Its release of the figures follows criticism from some quarters over the amount of government support given to the UK wine industry, which has won several high-profile awards in recent years. English sparkling wine has been served at official functions for several years.

‘The UK produces some of the finest wines in the world, and the Foreign Office is committed to showcasing them to a global market,’ said a spokesperson for the Foreign Office.

‘Our food and drink products are more popular than ever and we will continue to do all we can to support this vital sector, and create new export opportunities.’

Whilst the majority of wines produced in the UK are sparkling, the Government’s wine cellar is also serving English still whites and rosés to guests.


  • Young winemakers needed: UK college highlights ‘shortage’

  • UK ambassadors should ‘serve British’, says Foreign Office chief 

  • Taittinger starts planting vines for English sparkling 


Efforts from the trade

‘Earlier in the year, we urged Government departments to ‘Serve British’ and it’s great to hear that the FCO is stocking, serving and therefore supporting English wine,’ said Miles Beale, CEO of the Wine and Spirit Trade Association.

Earlier in the year, a bill was proposed to Parliament to make British embassies serve UK wines.

‘There has been a concerted move by the industry, the producers and huge support of WSTA over the last years to encourage Government to serve British products and in so doing, show their support for the fantastic food and drink industry that we have,’ said Julia Trustram-Eve,  of trade body UK Wine Producers.

‘It’s great to see that both FCO and overseas missions are now serving English wine and flying the flag for our exciting industry.’

Criticisms of English wine

Not everyone is such a fan, however.

Chef Marco Pierre-White is reported to have said ‘English wine is nonsense’ and that only a ‘numpty’ would buy it, at the launch of one of his restaurants this weekend.

‘Of course everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but there are many more fellow restaurateurs who would beg to differ, and do list English wines,’ said Julia Trustram-Eve.

The post English wine makes up half of UK Government’s cellar purchases appeared first on Decanter.


Read full article on decanter.com


Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.