Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

A Hong Kong-based tourism company and owner of members-only clubs in China has bought Château Fauchey in Bordeaux's Cadillac region.

Château Fauchey in Cadillac Côtes de Bordeaux.
Château Fauchey in Cadillac Côtes de Bordeaux.

HK-based private club owner buys Bordeaux winery...

The post Bordeaux’s Château Fauchey sold to Hong Kong investor appeared first on Decanter.


A Hong Kong-based tourism company and owner of members-only clubs in China has bought Château Fauchey in Bordeaux's Cadillac region.

Château Fauchey in Cadillac Côtes de Bordeaux.
Château Fauchey in Cadillac Côtes de Bordeaux.

HK-based private club owner buys Bordeaux winery...

The post Bordeaux’s Château Fauchey sold to Hong Kong investor appeared first on Decanter.

A Hong Kong-based tourism company and owner of members-only clubs in China has bought Château Fauchey in Bordeaux's Cadillac region.

Château Fauchey in Cadillac Côtes de Bordeaux.
Château Fauchey in Cadillac Côtes de Bordeaux.

A Hong Kong-based investor has become the new owner of an organic wine château in Bordeaux, according to Christie’s-owned real estate agent Maxwell Baynes.

Profitsun Holdings (Hong Kong), which specialises in real estate and tourism, purchased Château Fauchey in AOC Cadillac Côtes de Bordeaux last week.

A fee was not disclosed.

Profitsun is set to use wines from the château for its private clubs in Beijing, Shenzhen and Hong Kong, said the group’s chairman Mr Xu.

The new purchase is more evidence of Chinese investor interest in the so-called lesser appellations of Bordeaux, with wine supply a key motive.

Château Fauchey is a 27-hectare organic producer situated in Villenave de Rions.

Recent data from French land agency Safer estimated that Côtes de Bordeaux vineyards could cost up to 30,000 euros per hectare for the best parcels, with an average price of 15,000 euros.

The estate features a 15th century château building designed by French architect Vignaux.

The previous owners, Mr and Mrs Emmanuelli, acquired the property in 2010. The couple immediately converted the vineyards to organic farming.

‘After spending the last seven years of my life on this property, it is particularly gratifying to see someone interested in organic farming and the architecture of this exceptional castle, as well as the continuation of the project on wine tourism,’ said Mrs. Emmanuelli.

Fauchey was until recently available for B&B bookings, but Booking.com listed the venue as temporarily unavailable on Monday 24 July.

Currently 80% of the château’s plantings are Merlot, with the rest being Cabernet Sauvignon. It produces both red and rosé wines, with the red wine being aged 18 month in oak before bottling.

Profitsun Holdings has appointed a new president, Hugo (Hong) TIAN, to manage the property, and assist the group’s business in France.

Editing by Chris Mercer. Sylvia Wu is editor of DecanterChina.com.

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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.