Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

Lidl's newest Wine Cellar range places the spotlight on Hungary, accompanied by wines from regions such as Bordeaux, Alsace and the Rhône. Here are our top picks from the range...

Lidl wine

These are our favourite Lidl wines to try...

The post Best Lidl wines: New Hungarian Collection launches for summer appeared first on Decanter.


Lidl's newest Wine Cellar range places the spotlight on Hungary, accompanied by wines from regions such as Bordeaux, Alsace and the Rhône. Here are our top picks from the range...

Lidl wine

These are our favourite Lidl wines to try...

The post Best Lidl wines: New Hungarian Collection launches for summer appeared first on Decanter.

Lidl's newest Wine Cellar range places the spotlight on Hungary, accompanied by wines from regions such as Bordeaux, Alsace and the Rhône. Here are our top picks from the range...

Lidl wine

Scroll down to see our expert’s view of the best Lidl wines available in the UK this summer.

The Lidl Wine Cellar Hungarian Collection consists of 41 brand new wines for the summer, and is part of the supermarket’s continuing goal to introduce its customers to ‘exciting wines emerging from lesser known origins’.

The Hungarian Collection is available online and in stores from 27th July, and as always it’s a ‘while stocks last’ affair.

The wines have all been approved by Lidl’s panel of three Masters of Wine before hitting the shelves.

Amy Wislocki’s Lidl wine recommendations:

Domäne Wachau, Grüner Veltliner Wachau Terraces, 2016

A great introduction to this popular Austrian grape – all the delicious aromas and flavours you expect to find in a young Grüner...

Points 90

Lidl, Dornfelder Trocken, Pfalz, Germany, 2016

At a fiver a bottle, you won't find a better red for summer-drinking. There's a good Beaujolais in the summer range too, but I'd choose...

Points 90

Weiber, Crémant d'Alsace, Brut, Alsace, France

A great-value fizz. Perfect for a summer garden party, and an alternative to the usual default choice of Prosecco or Cava. Soft...

Points 88

Tuzko, Tolna, Gewurztraminer, Dél-Pannónia, Hungary, 2016

Looking for something different to enjoy with a Chinese takeaway? Try this off-dry Gewurztraminer from Hungary, bursting with notes...

Points 88

Serabel, Lirac, Rhône, France, 2015

Known for its rosés, Lirac also makes some great-value reds. And if you like your reds with a bit of evolution rather than forward and...

Points 88

Château Dereszla, Furmint Késői Szüret, Tokaji, 2015

Késői Szüret translates as 'late harvest', and this is certainly a sweet treat, with just under 100g of residual sugar. But it is fresh and juicy...

Points 88

Gere Tamás, Villány, Gránát Villány Cuvée

Another good one for the barbecue, this has spicy, leathery and farmyard notes. Easy-drinking, with spicy red fruits. A simple summer red.

Points 87

Château Guyon La Roseraie, Bordeaux, France, 2015

2015 was a great vintage in Bordeaux, and this easy-drinking claret is a value way in. Merlot-dominated, it has fresh red fruits and a hint of...

Points 87

Garamvári, Lellei Rosé, Balaton, Hungary, 2015

This isn't going to set the world alight, but it's an appealing, dry rosé with a pretty blush pink colour and fresh flavours of citrus and...

Points 87

Pierre Chavin, Lys Mystique, Languedoc-Roussillon, 2016

Slickly packaged, this would look good on the table. A mix of four southern French white grapes (Grenache, Marsanne, Roussanne and...

Points 86

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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.