Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

St-Emilion's highly rated Château Troplong Mondot has been sold to French insurance company Scor in a week of deals on Bordeaux's Right Bank, with Moueix family-owned Bélair-Monange also agreeing to buy two estates. Reporting by Chris Mercer in London and Yohan Castaing in Bordeaux.

troplong mondot, boreaux restaurant
Troplong Mondot's Les Belles Perdrix restaurant, opened in 2013 and gaining a Michelin star in 2016.

A rush of deals on Bordeaux's Right Bank...

The post Bordeaux: Troplong Mondot sold as Bélair-Monange buys two estates appeared first on Decanter.


St-Emilion's highly rated Château Troplong Mondot has been sold to French insurance company Scor in a week of deals on Bordeaux's Right Bank, with Moueix family-owned Bélair-Monange also agreeing to buy two estates. Reporting by Chris Mercer in London and Yohan Castaing in Bordeaux.

troplong mondot, boreaux restaurant
Troplong Mondot's Les Belles Perdrix restaurant, opened in 2013 and gaining a Michelin star in 2016.

A rush of deals on Bordeaux's Right Bank...

The post Bordeaux: Troplong Mondot sold as Bélair-Monange buys two estates appeared first on Decanter.

St-Emilion's highly rated Château Troplong Mondot has been sold to French insurance company Scor in a week of deals on Bordeaux's Right Bank, with Moueix family-owned Bélair-Monange also agreeing to buy two estates. Reporting by Chris Mercer in London and Yohan Castaing in Bordeaux.

troplong mondot, boreaux restaurant
Troplong Mondot's Les Belles Perdrix restaurant, opened in 2013 and gaining a Michelin star in 2016.
  • Troplong Mondot sold to insurance group Scor for unknown fee

  • Moueix family-backed Château Bélair-Monange agrees to buy Clos La Madeleine and Château Magnan La Gaffelière

  • In Cadillac further south, Château Fauchey sold to Hong Kong investor

  • Several more potential deals in the pipeline

Troplong Mondot deal

Scor has become the latest French insurance group to own a high-profile Bordeaux winery after news broke that it had bought Château Troplong Mondot, the St-Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé B estate, from the Valette-Pariente family.

A fee was not disclosed but it would likely have been at the higher end of the St-Emilion value scale.

French land agency ‘Safer’ said last year that St-Emilion vineyard prices ranged from 200,000 euros per hectare up to 2.5 million euros per hectare, depending on the site. Demand was outstripping supply, according to property consultancy Vineyard Intelligence.


See Jane Anson’s tasting note and rating for Troplong Mondot 2016


Xavier Pariente said that he would remain in charge at Troplong Mondot for the next three months, when Scor will appoint a new CEO.

Troplong Mondot has 33 hectares of vines, with 90% planted to Merlot, 8% to Cabernet Sauvignon and 2% to Cabernet Franc.

Clos La Madeleine and Magnan La Gaffelière

Separately, the Moueix family, headed by Christian Moueix and owner of some great domaines such as Trotanoy, Lagrange La Fleur-Pétrus and Latour à Pomerol, is set to add two new properties to its portfolio.

The family has agreed to buy Clos La Madeleine, a St-Emilion Grand Cru Classé, and Château Magnan La Gaffelière, a St-Emilion Grand Cru, via its existing ownership of Château Bélair-Monange.

‘The acquisition is in progress, we are waiting for the legal processes to be completed,’ Christian Moueix told Decanter.com.

With only 2.3 hectares, Clos La Madeleine is closest to Bélair-Monange and Château Ausone on the limestone plateau of St-Emilion and planted with 76% Merlot and 24% Cabernet Franc.

It was previously owned by more than 80 investors managed by Société Générale, a French bank and investment company.

Château Magnan La Gaffelière is a larger domaine with ‘a lot of plots’ covering 10 hectares, said Christian Moueix.

‘The terroirs are very diverse and very different to Bélair-Monange,’ he said.

‘For this reason we want to keep them separate from Château Bélair-Monange even if the acquisition was made by Bélair-Monange.’

As with all wines from the Moueix family, the wines will be distributed by Etablissements JP Moueix.

More deals in the wine world so far this year:

The post Bordeaux: Troplong Mondot sold as Bélair-Monange buys two estates appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.