Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

Last November, Les Sources de Caudalie was awarded the prestigious Palace status, a title held by the 23 finest five-star hotels in France. Victoria Marston visits...

Les Source de Caudailie

A perfect mini break...

The post Travel: Les Sources de Caudalie, Bordeaux appeared first on Decanter.


Last November, Les Sources de Caudalie was awarded the prestigious Palace status, a title held by the 23 finest five-star hotels in France. Victoria Marston visits...

Les Source de Caudailie

A perfect mini break...

The post Travel: Les Sources de Caudalie, Bordeaux appeared first on Decanter.

Last November, Les Sources de Caudalie was awarded the prestigious Palace status, a title held by the 23 finest five-star hotels in France. Victoria Marston visits...

Les Source de Caudailie

Les Sources de Caudalie

This article originally appeared on CountryLife.com.

Sitting on a terrace sipping the estate’s own wine, watching a horse working the organic vineyards and feeling refreshed after a facial at the spa, which uses the vines in its products, you will appreciate exactly why.

Owner Alice Tourbier calls Les Sources ‘an experience’ and it truly is: a mere 20 minutes from Bordeaux airport, the sense of tranquility here makes it feel a world away.

It’s also a family affair—Alice’s parents, Florence and Daniel Cathiard, of Château Smith Haut Lafitte, bought the vineyard here after former lives in business and as members of the French Olympic ski team, their daughter Mathilde started the Caudalie beauty brand and spa and Alice and her husband, Jérôme, entered into the fray with their wondrous hotel and three on-site restaurants.

The finest suite in the house is undoubtedly L’Ile aux Oiseaux, a cabin on stilts over a lake, which receives a makeover every two years.

The current incarnation, by bridal designer Delphine Manivet, is all soft-pink furnishings, shimmering mother-of-pearl tiles and floating white curtains—it’s like stepping inside a fondant fancy, in the best possible way.

Les Source de Caudailie


  • Anson: Guide to Bordeaux châteaux restaurants

  • Michelin Guide France 2017

  • Best Bordeaux restaurant wine lists


Don’t miss

The tasting menu at Les Sources’s two-Michelin-star restaurant, La Grand’Vigne, is truly unmissable. Dishes such as langoustine tartare with caviar are predictably mouthwatering, but a humble egg is the star. Chef Nicolas Masse varies the other morsels on offer, but his signature dish, oeuf de ferme, remains a constant. What one man can do with such a basic ingredient is, quite frankly, incroyable.

When asked about her favourite destination in France—not Bordeaux, mind you, but the entire country—Alice could hardly say the words Arcachon Bay quickly enough. The colours at this treasure of the French coast, she says, are like nowhere on Earth—and the oysters even better. Luckily, it’s just a 50-minute drive away from Les Sources and the hotel will happily arrange a day trip.

You simply must take a tour of Château Smith Haut Lafitte, once owned by a Scottish wine merchant—hence the Smith. The château has its own cooper—a rarity—who visits forests to choose the French oak for the barrels. The sight of his handiwork in the cellars is quite breathtaking—the central panel of each barrel is stained red with wine, purely for aesthetic effect. Bordeaux may be famous for its reds, but be sure to sample the whites, too—the clay soil and climate here are perfect for the Sauvignon Blanc/Sauvignon Gris/Semillon blends produced.

Prestige rooms from €300 per night, based on two sharing, with breakfast (00 33 5 57 83 83 83; www.sources-caudalie.com). easyJet flights from London Gatwick to Bordeaux from £23.24 per person (www.easyjet.com).

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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.