Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

A 'fantastic' harvest say winemakers, but there won't be a lot of it...

argentina harvest 2017
Vista Flores, Uco Valley

A fantastic harvest in terms of quality...

The post A small but promising vintage for Argentina 2017 appeared first on Decanter.


A 'fantastic' harvest say winemakers, but there won't be a lot of it...

argentina harvest 2017
Vista Flores, Uco Valley

A fantastic harvest in terms of quality...

The post A small but promising vintage for Argentina 2017 appeared first on Decanter.

A 'fantastic' harvest say winemakers, but there won't be a lot of it...

argentina harvest 2017
Vista Flores, Uco Valley

Argentina harvest 2017: A small but promising vintage

Off the back of a very wet El Niño vintage last year, it was a relief for winemakers in Argentina to return to its more characteristic dry climate.

Although quality is considered high across the board, damaging spring frosts significantly reduced the quantity.

‘2017 is a fantastic harvest in terms of quality,’ said Santiago Achaval, winemaker at Matervini.

‘After 2014 and 2015 were challenged by rain close to the harvest, and 2016 in spring and early summer, we had a return to almost normal Mendoza weather. The only problem was a series of near-frost events during spring. This resulted in a poor fruit set for Malbec, with yields down between 40% and 60%.’

A slightly earlier harvest than normal was a blessing in disguise for Mendoza as mid-April experienced a big downpour of rain and several hailstorms.

argentina harvest 2017

Hail in Mendoza.

‘The fast pace of the ripening was also stimulated by the generally low yields observed throughout the entire Mendoza province,’ said Doña Paula winemaker Marcos Fernández.

‘Production was 40% to 70% lower than in a normal year, especially in Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Pinot Noir.’

‘2017 will be remembered for its excellent quality and low volume. Low yields and excellent ripeness led to an impressive concentration of tannins and very intense colour.

‘The tannic structure offers mouth-filling wines, and we can expect tremendous ageing ability.’

In Salta and northern Argentina the yields increased compared to last year, with no reported complications.

However further south in Río Negro and Neuquén, late spring frosts also reduced yields by up to 40% followed by a hot summer, flash floods and hail.

‘The greatest challenge was a risky growing season, with menacing weather… frost, rain and heat waves!’ said Hans Vinding-Diers, winemaker at Bodega Noemía in Río Negro.

‘But the quality of the grapes remained perfect: great acidity, fantastic fruit and, strangely enough, low alcohols. Veraison took at least a month and a half to complete, this could have put a break on the sugars from rising too high.’

Argentina’s 2017 vintage was undeniably smaller, but should stand out for its concentration and quality.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.