Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

It's really happening: traditionalists and wine experts may look on through gritted teeth, but the producers of a 'blue wine' are set to expand to the US.

Gik Blue Wine
Website:

It's really happening...

The post Blue Wine is now available for pre-order in the US appeared first on Decanter.


It's really happening: traditionalists and wine experts may look on through gritted teeth, but the producers of a 'blue wine' are set to expand to the US.

Gik Blue Wine
Website:

It's really happening...

The post Blue Wine is now available for pre-order in the US appeared first on Decanter.

It's really happening: traditionalists and wine experts may look on through gritted teeth, but the producers of a 'blue wine' are set to expand to the US.

Gik Blue Wine
Website:

By Mike Pomranz for Food and Wine

Gik, the Spanish brand of blue wine that has become famous for being blue wine, is finally headed for the United States. Though an exact date of does not appear to be set, the brand has started letting American customers put in pre-orders on its BlueWine.us website.

For those who still think wine only comes in red and white or the occasional pink, a quick rehash: Despite originally only being available in Europe, Gik’s blue wine made international headlines last summer thanks to its striking, nearly turquoise hue. The name is not a play on words: This blue wine is truly blue. Adding to its allure, though the color may seem otherworldly, Gik maintains that the product is made entirely from natural organic ingredients: The wine itself comes from a mix of red and white Spanish grapes and the color comes from grape skin extract and a plant-based dye.

Though all that press helped Gik sell a lot of wine (100,000 bottles in 25 countries as of January), the company also ran afoul of European regulators who decided that since “blue wine” isn’t one of the wine categories defined by EU law, Gik couldn’t call their blue wine “wine.” The brand had to tweak its label, tweak its recipe and deal with a fine—but after a couple months it was back on the market.


  • Producers of banned ‘blue wine’ appeal for law change

  • Spanish firm launches ‘blue wine’ 


But while all this madness was going on in the EU, Gik had its sights on another prize: the US market. Originally rumored to be coming to the US last fall, The Daily Meal reports that the product is finally available for pre-order in America. A single bottle is listed for $16; a case costs $124. (Shipping appears to be free.) But before you start planning your blue wine party, be warned that completing the pre-order form simply leads you to a page that states, ‘We are amazed to see the incredible American response to Gïk Live! We feel really honored to witness the blue revolution getting so far, and that’s something we have to thank you for.’ It then continues, ‘Thanks for your pre-order…! We will get in touch with you shortly.’ You don’t even put in payment information—and when a company won’t even take your money, you know you may have some waiting to do.

So for now, it seems drinking blue wine in the US is as elusive as… well, drinking blue wine. While you wait, maybe just grab yourself a brightly hued Four Loko.

Original on Food & Wine

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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.