Vinification is the process that transforms the grapes into wine. The process of vinification differ from region to region, financial state of the winery and the grape types. The harvesting time and the type of oak used for aging are based on the region in which the wine grapes are grown.

Wine making process involves the following stages:

  • The first step in wine making process is Harvesting or Picking. Grapes should be harvested at the right time in order to make good wine. Harvesting can be done either mechanically or by hand.
  • The process of separating the grapes from the stems and cluster parts is called Destemming. Some of the wine makers keep some fragments of the stem to increase the wine tannin.
  • After destemming the grapes are crushed to extract the juice from the skin. This is done before the fermentation process begins. In the olden days bare feet is used to extract the grape juice, now a day machines like crushers are used.
  • Separation of grape juice and the skin is named as pressing. After crushing the grape juice will flow freely, selected wineries use pressers to make sure maximum juice is released.
  • Once the grapes are pressed they are introduced into the process of fermentation. During this process the grape juice are converted into alcoholic beverage. The yeast interacts with the sugar in the grape juice and converts them into ethanol and carbon dioxide.
  • Once the wine is purified and refined, they are preserved with sulfur dioxide or potassium sorbate. During the natural process of fermentation a minimum amount of sulfites are produced, but more is added for the use of commercial preservation.
  • Wines are aged for a particular amount of time to get more welcoming wine. Once after purification, the wines are moved to wooden barrels for aging. Metal vats, concrete vats and glass carboys are also used in some cases to increase the flavor.
  • After aging, the wines are bottled. During the process of bottling a final dose of sulfite is added to the wine to prevent it from uninvited fermentation in the bottle. The bottles are then sealed with cork and screw caps.

See what our judges thought about Amarone in this panel tasting from the May 2017 issue of Decanter magazine...

top Amarone Panel Tasting

See what our judges thought about Amarone in this panel tasting from the May 2017 issue of Decanter...

The post Amarone della Valpolicella – panel tasting results appeared first on Decanter.


See what our judges thought about Amarone in this panel tasting from the May 2017 issue of Decanter magazine...

top Amarone Panel Tasting

See what our judges thought about Amarone in this panel tasting from the May 2017 issue of Decanter...

The post Amarone della Valpolicella – panel tasting results appeared first on Decanter.

See what our judges thought about Amarone in this panel tasting from the May 2017 issue of Decanter magazine...

top Amarone Panel Tasting

The scores:

166 wines tasted

Exceptional – 0
Outstanding – 2
Highly Recommended – 25
Recommended – 82
Commended – 46
Fair – 11
Poor – 0
Faulty – 0

The judges:

Andrea Briccarello, Michael Garner & Susan Hulme MW


View the tasting notes and scores for all 166 wines here


Quality, typicity and vintage variation

Our tasters were cheeringly upbeat after tasting their way through 166 Amarones – by definition a high-alcohol and robust style.

‘There were some excellent wines here, and the tasting was surprisingly easy to enjoy, with well-tamed alcohol and good balance in most of the wines,’ said Andrea Briccarello. ‘The quality was there, and there was typicity.’

With more than 65% of wines Recommended and above, this was a fine tasting that emphasised vintage variation and importance of producer name.


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The top Amarone della Valpolicella wines of the tasting:


Final thoughts

Susan Hulme MW agreed that producer name is vital – pointing out that this drives pricing more than whether or not a wine is classico. ‘Amarone is about winemaking as much as anything else. Decisions around drying the grapes, length of appassimento, and time fermenting on skins make dramatic differences to style and quality.’

The top wines have amazing ageing potential, said Garner, but in general he wouldn’t advise long-term cellaring. ‘One of the great things about Amarone is its approachability. There are a few long-distance runners, but they’re more about palate roundness, ripe softness and richness. Drink them within 10 years of the vintage.’

Enjoy these wines at the end of a meal, said our tasters, or with Oriental food, where the residual sugar will contrast with and even magnify the spice.


More panel tastings:

The post Amarone della Valpolicella – panel tasting results appeared first on Decanter.


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Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Each wine is unique. Soil, weather, geology, varietals, and the style of wine making, are all decisive yet variable factors that give each wine a unique character.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.
Winemakers all over the world are combining wine making traditions of millennia with innovative approaches and ideas, to address consumer demand for high quality products and a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.